Antique Brick Oven

Fine meats are cooked on the charcoal grill, in the central hall.

The Taste of the Roman Tradition

In this charming place of Trastevere you can enjoy wonderful Roman Cuisine prepared with ingredients of excellent quality.
Our Menu offers the great classics Amatriciana, Carbonara, Cacio e Pepe, alongside genuine and delicate preparations of the Mediterranean tradition.
We take care of the freshness and seasonality to enhance the local products.
We suggest specialties of the Roman countryside, such as the famous “abbacchio” (lambkin) and the typical artisan cheeses, then first courses with fish and seasonal vegetables, fragrant second courses featuring aromatic herbs and, to finish the meal with lightness, colorful compilation of fresh fruits and creamy desserts.

Typical dishes

  • Tagliolini con gamberi e crema di pistacchi
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    photo © Damiano Rosa
  • Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe
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    With cheese and black pepper.
    This is a typical first dish of the Roman Cuisine. It’s a simple recipe, but the secret is the right balance between cheese and cooking water.
    photo © Damiano Rosa
  • Costolette di abbacchio a scottadito
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    This a typical Roman recipe. Ribs and pieces of lamb are cooked on the bone. Enjoy hot!
    photo © Damiano Rosa
  • Fettuccine al tartufo nero - Romolo, ristorante nel cuore di Roma tra mito e realtà.
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    The truffle has been around for what seems like forever. The Romans believed that it was of divine origin and, according to popular belief, it was the fruit of the sacred thunderbolt of Jove. The truffle is also known to be aphrodisiacs offered by the King of the Gods. After a period of decline during the Middle Ages, the bulb came back into fashion during the Renaissance and was served to the princes of the Italian Courts. Still today truffles are considered a culinary delicacy, appreciated by sophisticated palates. The Tuber melanosporum vitt, called black Truffle, comes from Italian Apennines (Umbria, Marche, Abbruzzo).
  • Tagliata di manzo al tartufo nero
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    Tasty dish made with entrecote or sirloin. It's seasoned with extra virgin olive oil and truffle slices.
    photo © Damiano Rosa
  • Coda alla vaccinara - Romolo, cucina tipica romana a Trastevere.
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    This main dish is the Roman oxtail stew usually made from veal tail and various vegetables. Its introduction dates back to times when it was customary to pay a vaccinaro (cattle butcher) in kind with the entrails and the tail of the animal. Butchers developed a way of turning their fee into a delicacy, thus Coda alla Vaccinarawas born. The veal tail is parboiled and the simmered with large amounts of celery, carrots and aromatic herbs. Following this, tomatoes and wine are added, then the mixture is cooked further with fry onion, garlic, ham and guanciale. The tail should be cooked such a long time that the meat separates from the bones. It is usually prepared to taste sweet-and-sour, using raisins, or something candied fruit or a small amount of grated bitter chocolate.
  • Carbonara
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    It is a classic of the Roman cuisine based on eggs, cheese (Pecorino Romano), bacon and black pepper. There are many theories for the origin of the name. It is very similar to the Italian pasta cacio e uova (from Lazio countryside) dressed with melted lard and mixed eggs and cheese. Some believe the dish was first made as a hearty meal for Italian charcoal workers of the Apennines (carbonari). It seems more likely that it is an urban dish from Rome. It was first described after the world war II, when many Italians were eating eggs and bacon supplied by troops from the United States.
  • Amatriciana
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    Originating from Amatrice (a small town of Lazio) is one of the most well-known pasta sauces in Roman cuisine. Amatriciana originates from a recipe named Gricia (Grici were what Romans called the shepherds from Lazio Apennines). The sauce was (and still is) prepared with guanciale, grated Pecorino and black or chili pepper. The introduction of tomato in the Gricia, creating the Amatriciana, dates back to the late 18th century. The recipe became increasingly famous in Rome over the 19th and early 20th centuries due to the connection between Rome and Amatrice, and went on to be considered a “classic” of Lazio regional cooking.
  • Rigatoni con la Pajata
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    With entrails of dairy calf.
    It’s a typical dish of quinto quarto. This tradition was born in the heart of Rome: the cattle butchers developed a way of turning their fee into a delicacy.
    photo © Damiano Rosa

The Taste of the Roman Tradition

In the heart of Rome the cattle butchers developed a way of turning their fee into a delicacy, thus the “Quinto Quarto” tradition was born.
We suggest the poor but delicious dishes from the contribution of this culture.
The Roman-Judaic Cuisine is more refined, made of tasty fried.
New recipes are also offered, departing from the tradition of Italian cuisine to get a modern interpretation of international taste.
Our creative touch enhances the traditional recipes and the genuine preparations of local products.

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